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developed regulations. i heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk about what he had learned as a mayor. he had been a central government official before and he realized once you got there, a central government officials do not understand a lives of ordinary people. and then he had to watch the proceedings and the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice. that was one of the first times in 35 or 40 years of going to china that i heard a chinese talk about procedural justice. the term is in the vocabulary. i think local experimentation may have the least helped in the increment the building of the change of legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of one of the american federal systems. the laboratories of the experiment. one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion, it is a large population. one virtue is that you can divided into provinces and you can have real experiments. try this over here and try that over there. that is a tremendous virtue. i read in your book, you h
data from u.s. cities compared to other cities in canada and other places, they're not radically different. what is most distinctive is that our violent crime is far more lethal and that is largely due to the fact that we have a rather porous system from trying to keep guns from dangerous system. >> connecticut has some of the strictest gun control laws in america get as you suggest it is very easy for weapons to move across this country, in my experience come whenever one of these mass shootings happens, it does not lead necessarily to tighter gun control. >> sadly, that is the case. typically, when such incidents occur, you have different agitations of those events. you have one set of individuals who say that we have to do something to strengthen our gun laws. then you have another group of individuals who say that we made it easier for teachers to have guns in public schools or what i consider to be rather fantasy come rather bad ideas. there are too many people who have this notion that the way we are going to solve this problem is to simply have more citizens armed and read
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, traveled to norfolk recently to look at how it has been struggling with flooding and preparing for the next big storm. he worked with member station whro to bring us this report. it's part of our series-- working with public media partners across the country-- that we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when r
and about box and the point i was trying to stress is i think the u.s. writ large, the government and also the civil society organizations and others were standing on the side lines here. they have to do private city along the same line. right now i think the u.s. policy, and again, u.s. government policy that those of you i think in the civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here where there's a desire among the political forces including the under islamists who want to bring about change in their political movement and were for the large part sitting on the side line here and we need to do more. >> we do need to move on to the q&a portion here. i would like to take a few questions from the audience the if you have a question raise your hand. we have migrants' circulating and we will take ten minutes before we begin to wrap up. >> i'm on the center for democracy and human rights in saudi arabia in washington, d.c. what's missing over on these discussions which i tend to miss them less and less is the fact that islamists haven't been told all along. the other point is there
. there was a sharia court in the city. these are basically consider it. >> civilian councils are trying. civilian councils are trying to wrestle more and more control from the fsa. the relationship as cooperative. in large depends on whether or not it meet that. i was able to meet with the commanders. i met with the supporters. not 10[inaudible] are either criminals gangs trying to take care of the chaos or the small extreme group that is well funded. majority are severly under funded. i met to the brigade commander with not enough food to go around. there's also that aspect but who is funded and who is not. they're trying to portray themselves as the ones that are leading the fighting in aleppo. they immediately rejected the coalition. this was reported. i got in touch with the commanders. the main fighting group in a lot of but of a video. they do not represent us. they said we recognize the council. i think of them as moderates. even their experience and food shortages. this is very well funded. this logic depends on whether 0% can receive reports. >> right now and maybe the case that people i
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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